Have any Questions? +01 123 444 555

The origin of the Snap T

These e-mails below document the origin of the Snap T and how this cast developed by Günter Feuerstein in the late 80ies came to US, got his name and finally became popular in Canada and later in the US.

 

-----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
Von: Günter Feuerstein [mailto:gf.ufc@smile.ch]
Gesendet: Donnerstag, 29. März 2001 23:29
An: Graham Anderson
Betreff: AW: Flycasting

 

Dear Graham,

 

nice to hear again from you. I was very busy and a lot of mails are still not answered yet. I don't know where that ends. I get about 20-50 every day...

 

I am very busy what video producing is concerned and the Montana Video was meanwhile honored several times. There were about 200 working hours necessary. I did everything on my own. Finally I got the music rights for the beautiful background musik and did the covers of the videos myself, too.

 

I did not forget about the casting and this season I am concentrating on the production of a fly casting video(German and English version, your TV system, too), that will show a lot of new things. It will be something special and I want to do it absolutely perfect, so everyone who buys it can make real profit out of it and will be able to improve his casting without a teacher if he is skilled enough and has some sort of analytic feeling. Harry will be of great help. He is a good photographer and he is retired since 1 March this year. So if you wait a little bit you will get much more than you can see on every single video on the market.

 

My spey or switch casts did change a lot in the fly fishing world over here. I can make every single one on grass and any combination with trick casts that is desired. I will also try to transfer the logic system that is behind each cast into my film. I think a lot of computer animation will be necessary, but perhaps we will find another way. The video also deals with teaching...

 

The cast you mentioned is one of my special casts. I created it many years ago and it has been passed around meanwhile. I use it when fishing for difficult fish so my line does not get over the fish before the fly arrives at his place. The cast has not got an English name, but we can give him one. What would you suggest? I will show this cast on the video, too, so it would be perhaps not to bad to use an English name for it in the German version, too, so everyone around the world will know, what is meant. Do you call it Snap T? The name is pretty good, but as I said, if you can think of a better one, please tell me.

I use the system behind this cast for some other variations of completely different casts as well. That's a never ending story...

 

I will not be able to come to Livingston this year. Charles will be there but I don't know if anyone else of our board will be present there, too. It needs two members to take the test. Maybe we will find a solution.

 

I would be very interested to come to Calgary again and of course if a casting clinic can be organized to reduce the costs, this would be a great idea. Anyway, I let you know, when I will be coming.

 

That's all for the moment.

 

Say hello to Peter!

 

Tight Lines!

Günter

 

 

Günter Feuerstein

Hofweg 4

CH - 9444 Diepoldsau

phone/fax:  +41(0)71 7332774

GSM:        +43(0)676 9166661

e-mail:     gf.ufc@smile.ch

internet:   www.g-feuerstein.com

 

 

 

  

 

-----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----

Von: Graham Anderson [mailto:bankside@cadvision.com]

Gesendet: Mittwoch, 28. März 2001 03:12

An: gf.ufc@smile.ch

Betreff: Flycasting

 

  Gunter,

  Greetings from the Bow River in Canada. All is well over here and we should be  done with the ice within a week.  We are looking at an all-time low snowpack in  the portion of the Rockies that feed the Bow River. It doesn't look like even  heavy snow from here on will help that much. We would like to see a lot of  rain and cloudy weather for the summer, if not, we may end up like parts of  Montana were last year. We may get weedy again this year and you saw  the Bow at it's weediest state in many years.

 

  Anyways, onto the casting. I have been casting most of the winter here as it has been above 0 deg C most days. I sure enjoyed a few of your "trick casts"

and that has led into doing a lot of that type of casting as well as many combinations of Spey variations, as well as some new cut-mends and variations of the Snap-T casts and roll-casting on grass.

I was sort of getting stale with my casting and watching your casting got me kick-started.

Thankyou.

  Peter and I went to the San Mateo Sportsman show in California this winter. Met and cast with many fine casters. We met a fellow named Floyd Dean who is a FFF Master instructor and tournament caster from the Golden Gate Casting Club in San Fransisco.

We traded some trick casts and saw the famous club with him. One cast that I showed him was one you showed me. You make your forward cast in a nearly horizontal plane and when it is about halfway unrolled you inscribe a small backwards circle or a small Snap-T, making the front part of the line, including leader and fly come back toward the caster and lay down facing the caster. Floyd is doing it at Angling shows and demonstrations. He was wondering if it had a name.

Also, I was wondering who originated it as we would like to give credit to him if possible.

Floyd also has some tailing loop mends that I am sure you would find very useful for nymphing. I could explain via email or wait until you come back.

  Also, how many Board of Govenors does it take to get a Basic European casting certificate?

I will be going again to Livingston and Charles Jardine will be there.

Maybe I could get tested with him.

   Saw you added some to your website and have a new video. If I could understand German I would buy a copy.

   I would be interested in buying any European casting videos, although they are likely in a different format.

  Say hello to Jupp and Harry, tell them we will see them you get back to Canada.

 

Graham Anderson

Bow River Canada

 

 

Copyright © Günter Feuerstein